Image: ACMP Scientist Eric StevensBiography:

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Eric Stevens, Science and Operations Officer, National Weather Service (Stationed in Fairbanks, Nome and Anchorage, Alaska as well as Marquette, Michigan); Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA, ’90 B.A.; Colorado State University, Fort Collins, ’94 M.S. Synergistic activities include frequent participation in the Geophysical Institute Science and Match Enrichment Experience, a science camp for middle-school students from rural Alaska villages and participation in UAF’s Outdoor Days, a program that brings middle-school students from local (Fairbanks) schools to UAF to participate in a variety of hands-on activities.

Lecture Presentations:

How to Conduct an Experiment
Presented Dec. 8, 2005
Lecture Summary
(click here)
Eric Stevens, a Science and Operations Officer for the National Weather Service in Fairbanks, Alaska, explains how to conduct an experiment and why it is important to do so. The scientific process is described and is illustrated with a brief coin flipping experiment. Stevens explains the possibilities of why an experiment may not turn out as planned, and discusses several ways to avoid flaws caused by equipment or tools used for the experiment in the final result. Probabilities and statistics also are briefly discussed to explain why a hypothesis truly is just a guess and often isn’t supported by the results. The lecture is followed by questions from students and teachers in the Bering Strait School District.
The Weather and Satellites
Presented Feb. 13, 2007
Lecture Summary
(click here)
Eric Stevens, a Science and Operations Officer for the National Weather Service in Fairbanks, Alaska, presents a lecture on the science of forecasting the weather. Stevens explains intuitive forecasting, weather stations, and weather balloons, and provides an in-depth discussion of weather satellites and their use. A weather balloon is displayed and each component of the balloon is identified and explained. The presentation focuses mainly on forecasting in Alaska, especially in rural areas. Stevens also explains the difference between weather variability and climate change. The lecture is followed by questions from students and teachers in the Bering Strait School District.
Lecture Summary
(click here)
Eric Stevens, the Fairbanks National Weather Service Science and Operations Officer in Fairbanks, Alaska, gives a lecture on why the weather varies globally and day-to-day. He explains the difference in vertical and horizontal weather and the parts of a weather balloon and how they are used to help predict weather. Stevens also explains the importance of collecting data and how collected weather data is shared around the world. The lecture is followed by questions from students and teachers in the Bering Strait School District.

Science Review:

Stevens reviewed the following ACMP classroom lessons for scientific accuracy:

  • Air Pressure
  • Analog Forecasting
  • The Beaufort Scale: A Local Model
  • Build a Thermometer
  • Build a Pyschrometer
  • Building an Anemometer
  • Building a Weather Vane
  • Climate
  • Climate Change
  • Climate Comparison
  • Climatology Forecasting
  • Clouds (Grades K-4)
  • Clouds (Grades 5-8)
  • Cloud Types
  • Convection and Wind
  • Decision Making
  • Evaporation
  • Finding Wind Direction
  • Historical Temperatures
  • How Oceans Affect Climate
  • Humidity and Air Saturation
  • Make a Snowflake
  • Measuring Humidity
  • Measuring Snowfall
  • Measuring Temperature
  • Name that Wind
  • Measuring Wind Speed
  • Persistence Forecasting
  • Precipitation
  • Project Jukebox
  • Seasons (Grades K-4)
  • Seasons (Grades 5-8)
  • Snowfall
  • Solid Water
  • Storm Chasers
  • Temperature (Grades K-4)
  • Temperature (Grades 5-8)
  • Trends Forecasting
  • Water Cycle Bag
  • Weather
  • Weather History
  • Weather Instruments
  • Weather Report Chart
  • Weather Versus Climate
  • Wind (Grades K-4)
  • Wind (Grades 5-8)

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Satellite image courtesy NOAA. Tree photo courtesy USDA.