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John Lingaas, Meteorologist, National Weather Service, Fairbanks, AK; Oregon State University, ’80 B.S.  Lingaas has worked for the National Weather Service in Fairbanks since 1980.  Synergistic activities include providing tours of the National Weather Service Forecast Office to school groups and making presentations in school classrooms.  Lingaas also participates in Geophysical Institute-led education outreach programs for middle-school students (Science and Math Enrichment Experiences).

Lecture Presentations:

The Weather and Balloons
Presented Dec., 12, 2006
Lecture Summary
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John Lingaas, a forecaster for the National Weather Service in Fairbanks, Alaska, explains in detail each part of a weather balloon (balloon, parachute, and radiosonde) and the role they play in recording weather information. Included is a discussion of how the radiosonde on a weather balloon measures temperature, humidity, pressure, and wind, and the methods of launching, tracking, and interpreting the data from weather balloons. Lingaas also mentions the role of weather stations in rural Alaska and how they relate to weather analysis and forecasting globally. The lecture is followed by questions from students and teachers in the Bering Strait School District. 
Data Display
Presented Mar. 9, 2006
Lecture Summary
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John Lingaas, Meteorologist for the National Weather Service office in Fairbanks, Alaska, discusses his work and what his job entails, how weather data is collected and used, and various ways to display data. His lecture includes demonstrations of types of data display including tables and charts, graphs, scales, maps, photographs, and pictures. Lingaas describes each type of display and its value and explains the value in data comparison. The lecture is followed by questions from students and teachers in the Bering Strait School District.
Lecture Summary
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John Lingaas, a forecaster for the National Weather Service in Fairbanks, Alaska, talks about the need for understanding air pressure systems. By giving examples, he explains what air pressure is, how it works around us as we go up or down in altitude, and the instruments used to measure air pressure. In the lecture he shows how air pressure is depicted on a weather map, giving examples using Alaska weather maps, and how information is shared globally. The lecture is followed by questions from students and teachers in the Bering Strait School District
Weather balloon photo courtesy NOAA. Atmospheric pressure system photo courtesy NASA.