Image: ACMP Scientist Cathy CahillBiography:

Cathy Cahill, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Atmospheric Sciences; University of California, Davis, ’90 B.S.; University of Washington, ’94 M.S.; University of Nevada, Reno, ’96 Ph.D. Cahill joined the Geophysical Institute in fall of 1998. Her research focuses on atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on visibility, global climate, ecosystems, and human health. Cahill’s research includes laboratory experiments and field studies of atmospheric aerosols and their properties. She is currently investigating the sources, size, and composition of optical properties of particulate matter entering the Arctic from Asia and other continents. Cahill was the recipient of a 1996-1997 Fulbright Fellowship to University College, Galway, Ireland.

Lecture Presentations:

Asking Questions to Prompt Student Inquiry
Presented Nov. 10, 2005
Lecture Summary
(click here)
Cathy Cahill, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Atmospheric Science at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, lectures on atmospheric aerosols and explains her personal interest in science. Cahill describes the elements that attracted her to study science, namely the act of asking questions using the scientific method to understand unusual events and information. The lecture also includes a discussion of atmospheric pollution and how to monitor and analyze data collected from the atmosphere. Cahill relates how particles found in the atmosphere over Alaska could have originated in Russia or China and what that means to Alaskan residents. The lecture is followed by questions from students and teachers in the Bering Strait School District.
The Atmosphere
Presented Oct. 10, 2006
Lecture Summary
(click here)

Cathy Cahill, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Atmospheric Science at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, lectures on atmospheric aerosols and explains her personal interest in science. The lecture includes a discussion of atmospheric pollution and how to monitor and analyze data collected from the atmosphere. Cahill relates how some of the particles found in the atmosphere over Alaska originated in Asia or Russia and what that means to Alaska residents. She discusses visibility, health effects, and wind patterns, as well as tracking ash plumes from volcanic eruptions and development of unmanned aerial vehicles for sensing atmospheric particles. Cahill also explains the skills necessary for a career in atmospheric science and how questions are key to any science endeavor. The lecture is followed up by questions from students and teachers in the Bering Strait School District.

Cloud photo by Piccolo Namek, via wikimedia.